Eco-chic: Has fashion pushed the issue of sustainability?

Eco-chic and the Earthshot prize

Whatever your persuasion, one could hardly not be impressed with the launch of the Earthshot prize at the glittering ceremony, held on the 17th October 2021, at London’s Alexandra Palace.

The Earthshot prize is an initiative of Prince William.

It is the most prestigious environmental award in history to support innovative methods of tackling climate change.

Each winner receives £1million prize money and a global network of professional and technical support to scale their remarkable environmental solutions to repair our planet and accelerate their impact.  

https://earthshotprize.org/first-ever-winners-of-prince-williams-earthshot-prize-announced/

Interestingly the guests at the award ceremony were asked to, “consider the environment,” when choosing an outfit to wear. Emma Watson, a presenter, wore a dress made from 10 different dresses from Oxfam.

Kate, herself wore a 10-year-old evening gown that had been minimally updated.

Fashion industry conscience raising  

The request for the guests and presenters to, “consider the environment,” when choosing an outfit to wear at the ceremony got me thinking: Is this the start of a new conscience raising awareness that the fashion industry needs to take seriously?

The industry needs to consider its part in halting and reversing the effects of climate change as it contributes 10% of global greenhouse gas emissions.

This signals a need to change the way we make and buy clothing.

Fashion will be a topic for discussion at the United Nations 26th Climate Change Conference (UN COP26) to be held in Glasgow from Sunday 31st October – Friday 12 November. https://ukcop26.org/

Eco-chic raising fashion awareness

Bearing this awareness-raising in context some brands are already focusing on this issue. I was quite taken by the efforts of the RÆBURN fashion house who work to a 3R’s ethos; RÆMADE, RÆDUCED, RÆCYCLED.

RÆBURN has a unique and innovative approach to creating menswear, womenswear, and accessories collections.

One example is turning decommissioned British military parachutes into iconic outerwear and curtains.

RÆBURN hopes this approach provokes the fashion industry’s approach to material use, and the merits of substance consigned as ‘waste’. Read much more about their pioneering efforts @ https://www.raeburndesign.co.uk/blogs/round-up/raestart-report-5-0

Eco-chic on a personal level

As consumers, we also need to consider our contribution.

Over the years we have increasingly bought into fast, cheap fashion with distant manufacturing and supply chains.

We are only just waking up to the cost that fashion is one of the most polluting industries on earth!

We need to consider:

Shopping with smaller brands like Magi Rose London, that can go deeper into sustainable solutions, have oversight of all their supply chains and are closer to manufacturers, allowing for the development of good productive relationships. Buy British made garments to allow for a low carbon footprint.

The actions to consider are:

  • Buy British
  • Buy less
  • Buy better
  • Shop for ethically sourced raw materials
  • Stop buying plastics like polyester
  • Be aware of the microfibre load, which sheds into the environment when laundered
  • Consider renting/swapping

A few things to think about as you consider refreshing your winter wardrobe!

Have a look at the MakeitBritish Online Christmas Marketplace https://www.marketbritish.co.uk/

Tra for now

Magi

P.S. Why not have a browse in our Magi Rose shop?